Our Wastewater Heat Recovery Process begins with a free, no obligation desk study report. We will analyse your energy bills, current carbon consumption and show you top line potential cost savings. Get in touch to discuss this with us.

Here are some frequently asked questions

Yes. Potential Users should conduct a needs analysis, assess their building’s heating and cooling system(s), and
evaluate the costs associated with building and operating a SHR system in order to determine whether it is a good fit.
In general, a greater demand for heating and cooling is a better fit due to the cost to build the system and economies of scale.

Yes. Potential Users should conduct a needs analysis, assess their building’s heating and cooling system(s), and
evaluate the costs associated with building and operating a SHR system in order to determine whether it is a good fit.
In general, a greater demand for heating and cooling is a better fit due to the cost to build the system and economies of scale.

Yes. Potential Users should conduct a needs analysis, assess their building’s heating and cooling system(s), and
evaluate the costs associated with building and operating a SHR system in order to determine whether it is a good fit.
Users may be required to do their own assessment and make their own decision. In general, a greater demand for
heating and cooling is a better fit due to the cost to build the system and economies of scale.

Much of the energy used to heat water for laundry, dishwashers, showers, etc., goes down the drain. SHR is a way to
harness that wasted heat as a new, renewable energy source with no new carbon emissions. SHR is a step toward
protecting the environment to combat climate change, and can help businesses establish green, and leverage sales and
occupancy engagement strategies by promoting sustainable practices that attract to tenants, buyers, and potential
investors.

The main technology used is standard equipment known as a heat exchanger. This device allows heat from a fluid
(raw sewage) to pass to a second fluid (refrigerant or water) without the two fluids ever mixing or coming into direct
contact. SHR also will likely use a heat pump, a pump, a grinder and some method to screen and filter out harmful
objects to protect the system’s equipment.

In general, yes. Wastewater can be considered a reliable energy source. Historical data shows that in the conveyance
pipes where SHR is most likely to be used, flow does not stop because there is no way to stop water from flowing into
them from all the various surrounding buildings and facilities. That said, we cannot guarantee the flow or temperature
of wastewater in our conveyance pipes, so a backup heating system will most likely be needed.

1. Access to an existing sewage line.
2. A hydronic heating or cooling system.
3. A redundant system for peak use.

Commercial building owners and/or developers with buildings in an area whose facility(ies) use hydronic (circulating water) systems to heat or cool buildings, and ones that are located near a sewer interceptor pipe. (Contact us for more information)

August-September 67 deg F (warmest average)
February-April 54 deg F (coolest average)

Yes. There may be opportunities for clean or renewable energy grants from the government

It depends on the complexity of each individual project and contractor experience and is up to the User’s design, but
in general the work involves digging a vault, and creating two sewer line connections.

Sewer service for individual customers typically wouldn’t be interrupted, but the Wastewater Treatment Division may
temporarily divert flows to accommodate the connection installation depending upon the location.

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